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Autumn Semester 2014

Autumn Semester 2014

  

Disciplinary and thematic modules
 

University of Basel
University of Bern
University of Zurich 

 

Integrative module

 
Communication and publication module
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Disciplinary and thematic modules 

 

University of Basel


swisspeace
 
PhD seminar: The Politics of Post Conflict Justice in Comparative Perspective

Lecturer: Briony Jones

Content: Transitional justice is a relatively new field of practice and academia, emerging in the 1980s in response to transitions from authoritarian rule to democracy in Latin America and Eastern Europe. Following the end of the Cold War we have seen an increase in intra-state conflicts and transitional justice measures are increasingly applied in such contexts. Understood by some as a narrow legal response to human rights abuses and by others as a thicker concept which includes forgiveness, reconciliation and memorialisation, transitional justice has come to be accepted as an important part of peacebuilding and dealing with the past.
Recent scholarship on transitional justice highlights its nature as an inherently contested process over which actors will disagree and within which choices and compromises are made. These dynamics are influenced by relative agency and power and are underpinned by assumptions and normative positions. This course will first provide an overview of transitional justice as a field/s including key assumptions, discourses and mechanisms. It will then go on to look at questions of epistemology, actors and agency, impact and assessment, and of contestation and hybridity. Concepts such as liberal peace, reconciliation, citizenship and justice will be covered along with cases and empirical insights from Uganda, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Rwanda and others.

The participants in the module have knowledge of an overview of the most important mechanisms and literatures of transitional justice. They are able to critically analyse discourses and practices of transitional justice. They understand the political nature of such discourses and practices in terms of actors, agency and power and can use empirical examples in order to interrogate theoretical and conceptual debates.

 
Time: The PhD seminar will take place on Mondays 12:15 – 14:00, start 15 September 2014

Place: Rosshofgasse (Schnitz), Sitzungszimmer S183.
 

Contact: Sandra Pfluger (sandra.pfluger@swisspeace.ch) and Briony Jones (briony.jones@unibas.ch)

ECTS: 3

 
Graduate School of Social Sciences (G3S)
 
The courses offered by Swisspeace are part of the Graduate School of Social Sciences. Further courses are published here.
 
For a description of the school please visit this link.
Contact: Dr. Günter Schmidt-Gess, guenter.schmidt@unibas.ch
  

Swiss TPH 

Ecology of Infectious Disease at Human-Animal interface

Lecturers: Prof. Dr. Jakob Zinsstag, Dr. Esther Schelling, Dr. Jan Hattendorf and Carlos Passos as guest lecturer from Brasil.

Content: Environmental effects on the risk of infectious disease are not new. Micro- and Macro Parasites share many fundamental properties with humans and animals. Hence an ecological perspective is appropriate for the understanding and control of infectious diseases. Ecological thinking recognizes the importance of fundamental physical, chemical and biological processes affect the survival and reproduction all living organisms. The lecture introduces to basic concepts of disease ecology and works them out on detailed case examples of zoonotic diseases, based on ongoing research. Besides the main biological aspects, their relationship to social, economic and political determinants will be emphasized and reflected against philosophical underpinnings in an intercultural context.

Aims:

  • Provide insight on ecology of infectious diseases in Africa to students of African studies
  • Insight on the impact of disease on sustainable development to students of Sustainable development 
  • Introduction to health in social-ecological systems to students in Epidemiology
Specifically the student should acquire understanding of:
  • The importance of populations and demographic processes for the transmission of zoonoses
  • Important classical and emerging zoonoses
  • Different transmission processes
  • Elements of network and systems theory of infectious disease
  • Importance of closer cooperation between human and animal health
  • Transdisciplinary methods connecting Academia and Society

Time: Tuesdays 8:15-10:00

Place: Herbergsgasse 7, Katholisches Universitätshaus, Basel

ECTS: 2

Registration: please register before September via Study Secretariat University of Basel (Christine Mensch, christine.mensch@unibas.ch)

 
One Health: Der Mehrwert einer engeren Zusammenarbeit von Human- und Tiermedizin

Lecturers: Prof. Dr. Jakob Zinsstag, Dr. Esther Schelling (Lecture in Teleteaching)
 
Content: The term “One Medicine” was coined by Calvin Schwabe and focuses attention on the commonality of human and animal health. The underlying concept is traceable to the late 19th century, in contributions of the German pathologist and architect of social medicine Rudolf Virchow. Schwabe states that there is no difference in paradigm between human and veterinary medicine and that both medicines have the same scientific foundations. Yet, human and animal health developed during the 19th and 20th centuries into fairly segregated disciplines or ‘silos’, separated at the academic, governance and application levels. In recent decades, the concept of “One Medicine” evolving to “One Health” has gained momentum worldwide after the SARS outbreak in 2003, then driven by fears of a possible pandemic of H5N1 avian influenza.  One Health now encompasses a broad agenda from zoonotic infections, food safety to health services delivery and beyond.
 
The contemporary human-animal relationship is complex and profound, ranging  from exploitation of livestock for food and anthropomorphization of animals as pets, to live “wet markets” and international trade in animal species; these processes, which are highly culturally determined, create interfaces between animals and humans, which lead in some instances, to disease emergence. Additional driving mechanisms of potential disease emergence or resurgence stem from: indiscriminate destruction of native habitats for economic or agricultural development; biodiversity loss and niche invasions; induced genetic changes (e.g, antibiotic-resistant bacteria or pesticide-resistant mosquitoes); and environmental contamination.
In considering “One health” as any form of closer cooperation between  the human and animal health sectors, it is necessary, but not sufficient, to recognize the linkage of humans, animals and the environment. In contrast, a sufficient requirement for a “One Health” approach is evidence of better health for humans and animals or financial savings to society from such a closer cooperation between the two sectors which could not be obtained if they worked in separation . Recently, “One health” conceptual thinking has evolved towards systemic approaches considering health as an outcome of social-ecological systems. This includes concerns about social equity and the “integrity” of the environment  “One Health” is clearly part of the broader consideration of ecology and health.
 
Environmental effects on the risk of infectious disease are not new. Micro- and Macro Parasites share many fundamental properties with humans and animals. Hence an ecological perspective is appropriate for the understanding and control of infectious diseases. Ecological thinking recognizes the importance of fundamental physical, chemical and biological processes affect the survival and reproduction all living organisms. The lecture introduces to basic concepts of disease ecology and works them out on detailed case examples of zoonotic diseases, based on ongoing research. Besides the main biological aspects, their relationship to social, economic and political determinants will be emphasized and reflected against philosophical underpinnings in an intercultural context (Zinsstag et al., 2012).
 
Aims:
  1. History, conceptual background and related concepts to “One Health”
  2. Complex disease ecology: people, animals, and environment; common attributes of neglected zoonoses and their control options.
  3. Added value of “One Health” for institutions, knowledge, burden of disease and economic benefits.
  4. Contextualised priorities and local gaps and needs analysis (inter- and transdisciplinarity) towards ownership in countries
  5. International intersectorial collaboration (‘global human and animal health governance’) and intercultural ethical implications
  6. One Health in communicable and non-communicable disease, surveillance, control and service delivery
  7. Assessing opportunities and policies of One Health in context
 
Time: Tuesday 15:15 - 17:00
 
Place:
 
Zürich 16/9, 23/9, 7/10, 14/10, 11/11, 18/11, 9/12
 
Bern 30/9, 21/10, 28/10, 3/11, 25/11, 2/12, 16/12
 
ECTS: 2
 
Registration: please register before September 16, 2014 via Vetsuisse Faculty of Zürich or Bern (Marietta Schönmann, m.schoenmann@vetadm.uzh.ch)
 
 
 
Advanced One Health Methods
 
Lecturers: Jakob Zinsstag, Nakul Chitnis
Content: This seminar extends the lecture “Ecology of infectious disease at the human-animal interface” und responds to the demand of students to provide deeper insight and practical work on “One Health” Methods. It is provided by a veterinary epidemiologist and a mathematician. The audience are advanced students and PhD candidates in the fields of epidemiology, biology, veterinary and human medicine. The Seminar is composed of lectures, self-study, discussions and practical seminar work on:
  • Theoretical foundations of “One health”
  • One health study design
  • Ecology of the animal-human interface
  • Dynamics and economics of cross-species disease transmission (The students will work through a practical example of an animal-human transmission model and a cross-sector economic analysis of an intervention). For 2014 the following topics are proposed
    • Reanalyzing an existing dog-human rabies model and extending it to a metapopulation model.
    • Develop a cattle-human bovine tuberculosis transmission model for Ethiopia
    • Develop an age and sex structured brucellosis transmission model for Mongolia.
Aim: The seminar provides theoretical and practical insight to “One health”, from for advanced students in biology, veterinary and human medicine and related fields. At the end of the seminar, students are able to do own animal-human transmission models and “One health” studies.
A seminar paper of 10 pages will be prepared individually and will be presented at the end of the lecture. A mark will be given for the oral (50%) and for the written paper (50%).
 
Time: Wednesdays 14:15-16:00
 
Place: Hörsaal 1, Swiss TPH, Socinstr. 57, Basel
 
ECTS: 2
 
Contact: Prof. Dr. Jakob Zinsstag (jakob.zinsstag@unibas.ch)
 
Registration: please register before September 16, 2014 via Vetsuisse Faculty University of Zürich (Marietta Schönmann, m.schoenmann@vetadm.uzh.ch)
 
 
 

University of Bern

 

Centre for Development and Environment

 
 
Democratic governance of land, food and water1
 

Lecturers: Prof. Dr. Stephan Rist, Dr. Elisabeth Bürgi, Dr. Jun Borras, Dr. Flurina Schneider 

Content: Governance has become a buzzword in development-related research, policymaking, and action. The term’s inflationary use makes it very difficult to address issues of resource governance in the context of research, policies, or collective action aimed at changing basic patterns of how different societies appropriate natural resources. This course contributes to a more systematic understanding of the term by taking a closer look at the emerging notion of “democratic resource governance” and the wider governance debates in which this specific concept is situated:
  1. Conceptual models of governance: What are the general features of different concepts of resource governance in key scientific traditions?
  2. The political economy of governance: Who is using the concept for what purposes?
  3. The political ecology of governance: How is the governance of land, food, and water systems linked to democracy and sustainability?
  4. Methodological approaches to governance: How can outcomes of the governance of land, food, and water be assessed?
The course is based on compulsory preparatory reading, inputs by 3–4 teachers, group work, role play, and plenaries.

Time: 27 – 29 October 2014 (3 days block course)

Place: Hauptgebäude Uni Bern, Hochschulstrasse 4, 3. OG Ost, Room 304

ECTS: 1.5

Contact: Prof. Dr. Stephan Rist (stephan.rist@cde.unibe.ch)

Registration: please register before 15 October 2014, via igs-north-south@cde.unibe.ch.
 
 

University of Zurich

 

 

Development Study Group

 

PhD seminar I

Content: PhD Seminar I is a 7 week course taught in the autumn semester, which aims to provide, firstly an opportunity for new cohorts of doctoral students to form informal cross-disciplinary networks and secondly to provide a basic set of knowledge of both the regulations and the process of obtaining a PhD within the University of Zurich.

Time: Every 14 days on Mondays from 16:15-18:00 starting 22 September 2014

Place: University of Zurich, Dept. of Geography, Winterthurerstr. 190, 8057 Zurich

ECTS: 1

Contact: Graduate School director, Prof. Dr. Ross Purves (ross.purves@geo.uzh.ch) and Dr. Isabelle Roer (isabelle.roer@geo.uzh.ch)

Registration: please register through: Dr. Isabelle Roer (isabelle.roer@geo.uzh.ch), with cc to Prof. Dr. Norman Backhaus (norman.backhaus@geo.uzh.ch)

Graduate School Retreat Seminar

Content: A key aim of the graduate programme is to build strong networks between doctoral students. 2nd and 3rd year doctoral students will be invited to attend a weekend retreat and present their research. These retreats will also feature a well-known international guest speaker, and all supervisors will be invited to attend at least once every three years.

Time: 27./28. November 2014
 
Place: extramuros
 
ECTS: 0.5
 
Contact: Graduate School director, Prof. Dr. Ross Purves (ross.purves@geo.uzh.ch) and Dr. Isabelle Roer (isabelle.roer@geo.uzh.ch)
 
Registration: please register through: Dr. Isabelle Roer (isabelle.roer@geo.uzh.ch), with cc to Prof. Dr. Norman Backhaus (norman.backhaus@geo.uzh.ch)
 
 
Zurich colloquium in Human Geography
 
Lecturer: Ananya Roy
 
Content: For the colloquium we invite an internationally renowned scholar for a public talk, a one day workshop and for individual talks with PhD students. In fall semester 2014, Ananya Roy from UC Berkeley will visit us. There are three parts to the colloquium:
(1) Ananya Roy's public talk on Tuesday, 4 November at 16:15 at the Irchel-Campus of the University of Zurich. Topic: Bottom billion capitalism – How poverty became a global market.
No prior registration is required.
(2) Furthermore, participants can also request a one-on-one meeting with Ananya on Tuesday 4. November to discuss individual projects (in order to schedule a meeting, one should also be participating in the workshop the following day).
(3) We are also organizing a day-long workshop with Ananya on Wednesday, 5 November, in which we will discuss her methodological and theoretical approaches to the study of poverty management. (roughly 9 am to 4 pm). There are a limited number of spaces still available.
 
Registration is required for both the individual meetings and the workshop. After registration, we will then provide you with more details.

Time: 4./5. November 2014

Place: Zurich (ZHGK)

ECTS: 1

Contact: Norman Backhaus (norman.backhaus@geo.uzh.ch)

Registration: Please register through Norman Backhaus (norman.backhaus@geo.uzh.ch) by the 22nd of September. Please include also a brief description of your research topic and affiliation.

 

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Integrative module

University of Bern

 

Next summer school will be offered in Spring Semester 2015

 


 

      

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Communication and publication module

University of Bern

 
Writing for an Academic Audience: The rules of scientific articles

Lecturer: Dr. Anne Zimmermann
 
Content: Writing articles for peer-reviewed journals is a must for researchers, as this is the prime means of communicating exciting new results to the scientific community; moreover, an academic career is often evaluated on the basis of the number of peer-reviewed articles one has been able to publish in journals (if possible journals with high “impact factors”). It is therefore worth learning the rules of writing such articles at an early stage. This e-learning course is designed to introduce researchers to the rules and context of writing scientific articles and to provide researchers with opportunities to advance and improve their own writing. Nine webinars will lead participants through the essential rules, tools, and context of scientific writing, and provide time for questions and answers. Students will also have an opportunity to practice their skills in individual exercises, work on their scientific texts, and act as peers in group assignments. In addition, individual Skype coaching sessions will be offered in January-February 2015. Topics will include understanding who one's audience is, working on key messages, structuring an article (IMRAD), doing” the different parts of an article efficiently, writing concisely and precisely, using paragraph structure and other language tricks, how to refer to relevant literature, doing tables and figures, submitting an article and suggesting reviewers, etc.

Completion of assignments is compulsory to pass the course. Students may miss no more than one webinar. A headset and installation of Adobe Flash Player are required to participate in the webinars. Please register by e-Mail (igs-north-south@cde.unibe.ch) by 2 October 2014.

Learning outcome: Participants have a structured knowledge of, and the necessary skills for, planning scientific articles and writing them effectively; in particular, they know how to:

  • Identify their audience and tailor their key messages accordingly;
  • Structure a scientific paper according to acknowledged rules (“IMRAD”);
  • Write and revise their work for clarity and effectiveness;
  • Find help and tools when they work on their theses and prepare their articles for publication in reputed scientific journals.

Time: This webinar takes place Thursday from 13:00-15:00; 16/10, 23/10, 30/10, 6/11, 13/11, 20/11, 27/11, 4/12, 11/12

Place: Online. Access to ILIAS for group work at any time.

ECTS: 3

Contact: Dr. Anne Zimmermann (anne.zimmermann@cde.unibe.ch)

Registration: please register before 2 October 2014, via igs-north-south@cde.unibe.ch.

Doing transdisciplinarity: How to increase the relevance of research for society
 
Lecturer: Dr. Flurina Schneider
 
Content: In the face of increasingly severe problems of global change, science is asked to produce knowledge that can help to advance sustainable and just development. Scientists and development experts generally agree that transdisciplinary research approaches are needed for achieving this goal. However, making research results useful for practice and achieving societal impact is not an easy task. It involves sound impact management and strategies for collaborating with stakeholders from the very beginning. The aim of this course is to acquaint the participants with approaches, methods, and tools for planning, conducting, and assessing impact-oriented transdisciplinary research. We will introduce these approaches, methods, and tools, explain step-by-step how to implement them, and assist the participants in applying them to their own research projects. Moreover, the participants will be encouraged to critically reflect on their own resources for conducting this kind or research, and about potentials and limitations of the explored approaches. Please register by e-Mail (igs-north-south@cde.unibe.ch) by 2 October 2014.

Learning outcome: Students know approaches for increasing the relevance of their research and are able to apply them to their PhD projects. Students are aware of their own resources and critically position themselves in the debate on science-practice interactions.

Time: This webinar takes place Thursday from 13:00-15:00; 16/10, 23/10, 30/10, 6/11, 13/11, 20/11, 27/11, 4/12, 11/12

Place: Online. Access to ILIAS for group work at any time.

ECTS: 3

Contact: Dr. Flurina Schneider (flurina.schneider@cde.unibe.ch)

Registration: please register before 2 October 2014, via igs-north-south@cde.unibe.ch.  
 
 

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